Create experiences that leave you in awe, for these will be the highlights of your life. ~Ryan Blair

Friday, October 10, 2014

How-to Piece Batting Scraps

What do you do with scraps of batting you cut off when trimming a quilt project? 
     1.) Toss them ALL in the trash.
     2.) Save them to use as stuffing in craft projects.
     3.) Or sew leftover pieces together to reuse as batting.

What type of projects do you like to make?
     1.) Only large bed sized quilts.
     2.) Only small wall hanging and art deco quilts.
     3.) A combination of sizes from small to large size quilts.

Will this method work for me?
     1.) If you make only large-sized quilts, in the traditional methods, then perhaps not.
     2.) If you make quilt-as-you-go blocks, this will work for you.
     3.) If you make only small-sized quilts, then this will be a great way to save on batting.
     4.) If you need practice blocks to learn new techniques, this is a good alternative.



HOW-TO PIECE BATTING SCRAPS

Here, I share with you what can be done with scraps of batting to actually make use of them again. These re-pieced batting pieces work well for individual blocks and small-sized quilt projects; or if you need to add a strip of batting to a piece that isn't quite large enough on a particular project.


STEP 1:
Gather up any odd-shaped pieces of batting to see what you have saved from previous projects. Then prepare them to create new batting sections to use on other projects.

BATTING SCRAPS


STEP 2:
Thread your machine with a light colored thread to sew these pieces together. (Thread color is not really critical here. If you have numerous bobbins that are only partially filled and would like to empty them for other colors, you may use these up in this step.)


STEP 3:
It is very important to straighten the edges that will be facing each other. This will allow for a better fit when stitching them together. Use your rotary cutter and ruler to cut these sides.

STRAIGHTEN ONE EDGE ON EACH PIECE TO BE JOINED


STEP 4:

Lay both pieces side by side so the straightened edges touch each other. Do not overlap the edges. Then sew them together using a zigzag stitch. Set the stitch to its widest width. (7.0)

JOINING PIECES OF BATTING


STITCHING TIP: You may use a regular zigzag stitch to join these pieces; however, I have found that a three-step zigzag stitch works much better.  This stitch uses three stitches instead of one for each side of the zigzag allowing more stability in the stitching process. It also makes the join feel smooth and flat to the touch. (Both will still work fine, just nice to have other options.)

See the difference below...

THREE-STEP ZIGZAG STITCH
REGULAR ZIGZAG STITCH


PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT they say...

Wouldn't we all like to be experts without the practice?  Keep dreaming; however, to perfect our skills we still need to PRACTICE. :(

All this takes time and materials, so what better way to start practicing then: by using scraps that may otherwise be tossed out.

In the process, we help ourselves and the environment, as well!!


PIECED BATTING STRIPS
STRING-PIECED BLOCKS READY TO EMBELLISH


No matter which way... 
you like to use your scraps (either batting or fabrics), here's a great start to creating unique one-of-a-kind quilt projects from remade pieces.



Piecing to Quilting to Snuggling under a cozy quilt!  Here we go....



PS....  
Anyone interested in participating in a 2015 BOM using pieced blocks as shown in the photo above and creating a unique scrappy quilt with the quilt-as-you-go method? Let me know.




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